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Posts for: December, 2017

By Kirkland Smiles Dental Care
December 29, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: tmj   jaw pain  

Are you suffering from jaw pain?tmj

The dentist of Kirkland Smile Dental Care in Kirkland, WA, know just what to do!

TMJ

The Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) connects to your lower jaw and to the skull in front of the ear. There are some facial muscles that control chewing also attached to your lower jaw.

Temporomandibular joint syndrome is a disorder accompanied with consistent pain in the area near your ear, jaw or muscles on the side of your face. You may suffer from a clicking or popping sound and/or restricted jaw movement.

Causes of TMJ

The TMJ is subject to various issues, such as:

  • Inflammation
  • Sore muscles
  • Strained tendons
  • Ligaments
  • Disk problems
  • Physical and psychological stress

Signs and Symptoms of TMJ

  • Clicking Sounds — If you're suffering from TMJ, you may hear a clicking, popping sound coming from the TMJ when you open or close your mouth. This is usually caused by a shifting of the disk inside the joint. The clicking may be so loud, someone standing next to you may hear it.
  • Muscle Pain — You may feel pain in your cheeks, where the pairs of jaw-closing muscles are located. If you feel soreness and stiffness upon waking up in the morning, it may be related to clenching and/or grinding the teeth at night. A nightguard may help relieve that pressure, but be sure to speak with your Kirkland doctor.
     
  • Joint Pain — Pain usually comes from one or both jaw joints and would be considered arthritis.

Relieving the Pain

Once your doctor has examined you, he can start designing a treatment plan. Here are some ways he may improve your diet or lifestyle:

  • A softer diet to reduce stress on the muscles and joints.
  • Ice and/or moist heat to relieve soreness and inflammation.
  • Gentle stretching exercises to avoid muscle spasms.
  • Medications and muscle relaxants for pain relief.

For more information, contact Kirkland Smile Dental Care in Kirkland, WA, today!


By Kirkland Smiles Dental Care
December 22, 2017
Category: Uncategorized
KeeptheSpacebetweenanImplant-SupportedBridgeandtheGumsClean

Dental implants can do more than replace individual teeth — a few well-placed implants can support other restorations like a fixed bridge. The natural integration that occurs between the bone and the implant's titanium post creates a strong, durable hold for both implant and the supported restoration.

But if a bone-implant connection weakens, the implant could be in danger of failing. This can occur because of periodontal (gum) disease caused by dental plaque, a thin film of built-up food particles and bacteria on the teeth. Untreated, the infection can ultimately spread from the gums to the bone and cause it to diminish in volume. If the bone loss occurs around an implant the threaded surface of the post may be exposed, inviting more plaque buildup. This can trigger more bone loss and eventually implant failure.

That's why you must brush and floss daily to remove plaque on and around your fixed bridge just as you do your natural teeth. Brushing around a bridge could be difficult with a traditional brush, so you may want to use an interproximal brush designed for just such situations. Be sure any utensil you use contains only plastic parts — metal creates microscopic scratches in the restoration materials that could harbor plaque.

You should also floss between the bridge and gums as well as between any natural teeth. While this can be difficult with traditional flossing methods, there are some tools to make it easier.

One is a floss threader, a small tool with a loop on one end and a stiff plastic edge on the other. With floss threaded through the loop, you gently guide the edged end between the bridge and gums. Once it passes through, you wrap the two ends of the floss with your fingers as you would normally and work it along each side of the nearest implants.

You can also use pre-cut floss sections with stiffened ends to pass through the gap, or an oral irrigator that loosens and flushes away plaque with a pressurized water stream. Just be sure you flush debris away from the gum and not toward it.

Keeping all surfaces of your implant-supported bridgework clean of plaque is necessary for its longevity. Be sure you also visit your dentist regularly for more thorough cleanings.

If you would like more information on oral hygiene with dental implants, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Kirkland Smiles Dental Care
December 07, 2017
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health  
HolidayTipsforHealthierTeeth

As the old song says, “’Tis the season to be jolly.” And for many of us, the year-end holidays offer a perfect opportunity to break out of our daily routine and get together with co-workers, friends and family.¬†Whether it’s a casual gathering at home or a night on the town, one thing is for sure: There’s likely to be plenty of food and drinks at hand to keep the good times rolling.

We’re not going to say that you should never indulge in a sugar cookie or a tumbler of eggnog. But everyone knows that too much of a good thing can be bad for your health. So here are some simple tips to help keep your oral health in good shape while you’re enjoying the holiday season.

Choose Healthier Snacks — good-tasting munchies don’t have to be bad for you. Plant-based hors d’oeuvres like hummus with raw vegetables can be just as delicious and satisfying as chips and dip—and a lot healthier, with plenty of vitamins and fiber, and little or no sugar. Cheese, yogurt and other dairy products, eaten in moderation, can actually be beneficial for your oral health: they can stimulate the flow of saliva and restore minerals to the teeth. If you choose to eat sweet snacks, limit them to around mealtimes. That way, your mouth gets a break from sugar and acid in between meals.

Drink Plenty of Water — Sure, there are plenty more exotic beverage choices. But for better health, alternate those fancy drinks with glasses of water. Sugary, acidic beverages like soda (or even juice) can feed decay-causing bacteria and weaken the tooth’s enamel, leading to cavities. Alcohol dries out the mouth, which can cause a number of oral health problems. But water promotes the body’s production of beneficial saliva, and keeps you healthy and hydrated. It also helps neutralize tooth-eroding acid and wash away sticky food residue that can cling to your teeth.

Don’t Neglect Your Oral Health Routine — Sure, between frantic holiday shopping and eagerly anticipated get-togethers, it may seem like there aren’t enough hours in the day. But it’s always important to maintain your regular oral health routine—and even more so at this time of year. Brushing twice a day for two minutes each time and flossing once a day are proven ways to prevent cavities and gum disease. Find a few minutes to take care of yourself and you can keep your smile looking good all year long.

The holidays are a time for friends, family, fun and celebration. We offer these suggestions with our best wishes for a safe and healthy season. If you would like more information about how to maintain good oral health—during the holidays or any time of year—please contact our office or schedule a consultation. Read more in the Dear Doctor magazine articles “Nutrition and Oral Health” and “10 Tips for Daily Oral Care at Home.”